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INSPECTION SERVICES

Home inspections can help you buy or sell your home with confidence. Inside Out Inspection Services provides Home Inspection Services throughout the King, Pierce, and Snohomish Counties.

What's Involved in a Home Inspection?

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1. Roofing
Roofing refers to the materials used to construct the roof of the home. A home inspector will check to ensure that the roofing materials have been installed properly, that they are proper materials for the pitch of the roof that the flashing and gutters have been installed properly and that there are no material defects, debris buildup, or potential for leaks.

2. Insulation
Installations refers to the materials used to prevent elements such as sound, heat, and cold from traveling from one area to another. A home inspector will check for proper installation and will assess whether the insulation, where visible is adequate to prolong the life of the roof while also providing comfort within the home.

3. Ventilation
Ventilation refers to the circulation of air within the home. A home inspector will check the attic space to assess whether there is adequate ventilation to reduce heat buildup and prolong the life of the roof. She will also inspect ventilation fans, where visible, in bathrooms, kitchens, and laundry rooms to ensure that they vent properly to the exterior.

4. Exterior
The exterior refers to the elements of a home that are situated outside. A home inspector will check the siding, flashing, and trim all exterior doors; and attached or adjacent decks, porches, or patios and any adjacent or entryway walkways or driveways. She will also inspect any vegetation, grading, surface drainage, or retaining walls that are likely to adversely affect the building.

5. Interiors
Interiors are the elements that are located within the perimeter of the home. A home inspector will check a representative number o doors and windows, including all windows located in the bedrooms, to ensure they are operable. She will also check walls, ceilings, floors, steps, stairways, and railings to assess their condition.

6. Bathrooms
Bathrooms refer to the rooms within a home contacting a toilet, a sink and usually a tub or a shower. A home inspector will check the plumbing systems and electrical systems to ensure they are fully operable. She will also check for visible water leaks.

7. Fireplaces
Fireplaces refer to an interior space where a file can be built or where case can be ignited, often providing a secondary source of heat. For gas fireplaces, a home inspector will check for normal operation by turning on the fireplace. For solid fuel fireplaces, the home inspector will open the damper to ensure it opens and closes correctly, will check for breaks and cracks; and will assess the condition of the chimney, brick and mortar.

8. Electrical Systems
The electrical system is the system of wiring, switches, relays, and other equipment that provides electricity to the home. A home inspector will check the service drop; service entrance conductors, cables, and raceways; service equipment and main disconnects; service grounding interior components of service panels and subpanels, conductors and overcurrent protection and devices.

9. Air Conditioning
Air-conditioning is the system that keeps air cool and dry and circulates it throughout the home. A home inspector will check to make sure that the exterior unit is level and on a solid pad and that there is a proper electrical disconnect. She will also check the condition of the lines and for proper operation (if possible, depending on weather).

10. Garage/Carport
The garage is part of a building or a detached building made to house automobiles. A carport refers to an open-sided shelter made to house automobiles. A home inspector will inspect the flooring, gutters and siding of the structure, the electrical system and the garage door to ensure it's operable.

11. Electrical Fixtures
A home inspector will check the arc fault circuit interrupters, the ground fault, circuit interrupters and the representative number of installed lighting fixtures, switches and receptacles to ensure they are operating correctly. The home inspector will also check for the presence of smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors.

12. Appliances
Appliances are the pieces of equipment designed to perform a specific function within the home. A home inspector will turn on the appliances to the the respective electrical, gas, and plumbing connections.

13. Structures
Structure refers to the components of the constructed building. A home inspector will check crawl spaces, the basement, the foundation, the roof framing, and any other visible framing components to assess their condition.

14. Sump/Sewage Ejector Pump
A sump pump is the pump that removes water that has accumulated in unwanted areas of the building. A sewage ejector pump ejects swarge from homes where the plumbing systems are located at a lower level than the home's sewer line, as is generally the case in finished basements. A home inspector will check to ensure that the sump pump and the sewage ejector pump are operable and that the above ground components are properly installed.

15. Heating system
The heating system uses thermal energy to regulate acceptable temperatures within the home. A home inspector will check to ensure that th system is operating, that the services records are up to date, and that the distribution systems are working properly.

16. Plumbing System
The plumbing system is the utility consisting of pipes and fixtures for distributing water and gas throughout the home and the disposal of sewage. A home inspector will check the interior water supply and distraction systems; the drain, waste, and vent systems the water-heating equipment and hot water supply systems and the fuel storage and fuel distribution systems.

17. Ventilation System
Ventilation refers to the circulation of air within the home. A home inspector will check that the ventilation systems are operating properly and that there is adequate ventilation in the interior spaces, especially those prone to moisture buildup, such as bathrooms, kitchens, laundry rooms and attic spaces.